Archive for the ‘extremism’ Category

50 Shades of Extremism – Muslims Policing Other Muslims

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Published on Huffington website here on 31st March 2016.

EXTREMISM red stamp text on white

Glasgow shopkeeper, Asad Shah, was murdered by another Muslim for what appears to be a religiously motivated crime. Mr. Shah had wished Christians a Happy Easter. This event is significant because it marks the levels of intolerance Muslims themselves are facing from a fringe minority within their own communities. I worry this minority is growing. How have we ended up in this situaton? Muslims are now regularly castigated online by other Muslims for expressing greetings such as ‘Happy Birthday,’ ‘Happy Christmas and even ‘Happy Mothers Day!’ It never used to be like this.

Who influences these bigoted Muslims? Is it (pseudo) scholars such as Zakir Naik who promotes his propaganda through his Satellite station, Peace TV? He is popular amongst South Asian Muslims and was banned by Home Secretary Theresa May in 2010. Or is it those who have their own slots on the various Asian and Islamic UK based satellite TV stations, some of whom are also invited to speak at University Islamic Society events? Or is it the growing number of international celebrity scholars online with huge social media followings?

Of course people should be free to express their views providing they don’t incite violence. If they think it is against their faith to say ‘Happy Easter’ or ‘Happy Diwali’ then they should be able to say so. However, it is important to try and identify why some are policing other Muslims and think it is acceptable and perhaps even their religious duty to punish them because they have a different religious perspective. The attacks can be verbal or physical. In Islam we believe only God declares what is lawful (halal) and what is unlawful (haram). It seems now to be a regular occurrence being told things are ‘haram’ and therefore against Islam. We have good scholars who are moderate in their views but unfortunately those with hardline opinions often drown their voices out. In fact they are also attacked and maligned in an attempt to discredit them so their views don’t gain traction amongst Muslim youth.

Islam has a long tradition of recognising differences of opinion and debating with respect (Quran 16:125). The fringe that claims to be an authority on Islam are devoid of the most basic Islamic etiquette and blatantly ignore the Quran’s spirit of mercy and tolerance. Muslims who express views regarded as too moderate and therefore against their narrative (and according to them against Islam), are often bullied and smeared including incitement of hatred. Many Muslims have been subjected to such aggressive behaviour regularly through social media. The Online trolls who go after Muslim men and women in this manner are often connected to each other and sometimes operate in packs. Muslims like myself are also regularly referred to in derogatory terms such as ‘House Muslims,’ (derived from the term House Negro) ‘Uncle Toms,’ and ‘Sell Outs.’ It is used to dehumanise any Muslim who disagrees with their worldview. They are portrayed as traitors pandering to the interests of White people, especially those in media and government. This is arrogant, dangerous and also bigoted rhetoric. Contrary to what they may believe and want, Muslims are diverse in their religious and political views and can think for themselves and engage with people in power on their own terms. We are a part of British society and should be engaging on every level and not shouting and whinging from the margins.

These bigots can disagree and move on but they don’t. They want to harass in an attempt to silence and shut alternatives voices down. They want to enforce one religious and / or political ideology. They will stop at nothing to achieve their aim including accusing Muslims of changing Islam and refusing to accept that Muslims are diverse and believe in different interpretations. This deliberate tactic now being employed against British Muslim is a sinister one because the consequences of implying that someone is a heretic or is committing blasphemy can be fatal. It is a subtle and covert form of extremism. There are 50 shades of extremism and this is one of them.

Unfortunately I am now on this hit list of Muslims to target. After being trolled on Twitter recently, an anonymously written article appeared online criticising a number of Muslims. Interestingly the article was called, Deformist Subversions: British Islam Architects and Shaista Gohir. It is clear the intention of this piece is to promote that we (and especially me) are distorting Islam. I have even been given my own Islam and it is called Gohir’s Islam. The next step can easily be accusing me of heresy and blasphemy or hope that others will do that after reading the article. Perhaps the author wants to remain anonymous to avoid responsibility of any consequences from this article.

We know what happens to those deemed as heretics and blasphemers in some Muslim countries. In fact a few UK imams have been glorifying Mumtaz Qadri who murdered a Pakistani politician, Salman Taseer, who stood up for Christians and questioned the blasphemy law, which is often abused and used to persecute minorities. Muhammed Asim Hussain, an Imam from Bradford called Qadri a martyr and that he had honoured the Prophet. His comment was liked nearly 136000 on his Facebook. Muhammad Masood Qadiri, who presents a weekly programme on Ummah TV, also told his Facebook followers that Qadri was a martyr. Most recently Maulana Habib Ur Rehman of Glasgow Central Mosque has also praised the extremist. I can’t help but wonder given such comments, was the Glasgow shopkeepers murder a copy cat killing especially considering that the victim is believed to be from the Ahmadiyyah sect of Islam who are often vilified both in the UK and abroad and often routinely declared as not Muslim.

 

Muslim Women Can Help Stop Youth From Going to Syria

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

I haven’t spoken on the issue of ‘preventing violent extremism‘ for a number of years. I became disengaged because I was not happy about the way in which government officials sometimes handle this issue. However, I have decided to break my silence after seeing media reports of British Muslims who have either moved to Syria to join the anti-Assad rebels, have got killed in Syria or have been arrested on their return to the UK. I feel it is important to raise awareness about the dangers of getting involved in the conflict and Muslim women can play a key role in helping to safeguard young people. I am supporting the national police campaign today and will speaking at the event organised by West Midlands Police. I will be urging Muslim women in Birmingham and also members of the Muslim Women’s Network UK to spread the message that anyone who wants to help the Syrian cause needs to ensure they are doing this safely and legally. This issue is very relevant locally – since January a number of people have been arrested in Birmingham and are currently awaiting trial.

Suffering of Muslims overseas has always been a powerful recruitment tool. Graphic images of civilians being killed will make people emotional and angry. We all get angry and upset over the Syria crisis but most of us will not be consumed by it and continue with our daily routines. Unfortunately there are individuals out there who will exploit these emotions by trying to get some youth to become preoccupied with the Syrian conflict. This will make them more susceptible to radical ideas, which could include getting involved in violence and other activities to support opposition groups.

However, some British Muslims may think there is nothing wrong or illegal about going to Syria to fight because they are opposing Bashar Al Assad. They may think ‘well we can’t get into trouble for this because we are on the same side as the British government.’ Our government’s inconsistency over being prepared to join the war against Assad and therefore siding with the ‘rebel’ fighters one minute and then calling them extremists the next, is no doubt causing confusion. The government needs to explain this and so far have failed to do so.

I do believe most people going out to Syria are doing so for charitable purposes, either to deliver aid or to do humanitarian work. However, conflict zones are dangerous places. Even if people manage to keep safe, emotions will run high after witnessing human suffering. Extremist groups operating in Syria will be ready to exploit this vulnerability to get people to join as combatants. Young women can also be manipulated and recruited to these groups in supportive roles such as transporting food, cooking, medical care of the wounded, fund raising and to pray for the fighters. Women may also be encouraged to marry fighters and by glorifying this role of wife. They may be told that it is honourable, and a privilege to be married to a man who will be a martyr.

Leaving these groups will not be easy because they will escalate involvement to make new recruits think they are in too deep to break away. Another commonly used tool to maintain loyalty involves getting members to take a pledge of obedience in the name of God. This tactic makes members believe that disobeying orders or leaving the group amounts to committing a grave sin.

So what can Muslim women do to stop young Muslims from going abroad and getting involved in the Syria conflict? Well women can be the first to see behavioural changes amongst family members including a preoccupation with the Syria crisis. They can warn of the dangers of going to Syria including tactics used to recruit and how even helping with humanitarian work can result in being drawn into activities that could be considered illegal under British law. These conversations can be essential in the early prevention process. Women can also help manage the emotions of young people by directing them to channel their energies in supporting established and recognized charities with their work. Many individuals are now fund raising for Syria. Although their efforts may be well intentioned, there is no way of really knowing where this money will end up. Only donating to internationally renowned charities already operating in Syria, such as Islamic Relief, should be encouraged. Humanitarian efforts should also be left to these charities, which are experts in operating in conflict regions.

Summer holidays are approaching and some students may be thinking of going to Syria to try and help out while others may be going to seek adventure so they can return to college or university to boast about their experiences. Whatever the reasons, they could end up getting killed or find themselves on the wrong side of the law when they return home. So now is the right time to start having these conversations.

Many British families are oblivious to would-be jihadists.

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Published in the Telegraph here

I am supporting the national police campaign, launched on Thursday, which calls on women to stop loved ones heading to Syria. Today, I am speaking to members of the community – families and women – at an event organised by the West Midlands Police to raise awareness about the dangers of getting involved in the conflict and highlight how Muslim women can play a key role in helping to safeguard young people.

This issue is very relevant where I live – since January, five people have been arrested in Birmingham because of their involvement in Syria and are currently awaiting trial.Muslim women in Birmingham must spread the message that anyone who wants to help the Syrian cause must make sure they are doing so safely and legally.The suffering of Muslims overseas has always been a powerful recruitment tool. Graphic images of civilians being killed will no doubt make people back in the UK emotional and angry. Unfortunately, however, some individuals are using these stories to exploit these emotions, by trying to get some young people in Britain to become preoccupied with the Syrian conflict. This makes them more susceptible to radical ideas, which could include getting involved in violence and other activities to support opposition groups to the Syrian regime.

Some British Muslims may think there is nothing wrong or illegal about going to Syria to fight, because they are opposing Bashar Al Assad. They may think that they cannot get into trouble because they are on the same side as the British government.On the other hand, I believe that most young Britons going out to Syria are doing so for charitable purposes, either to deliver aid or to do humanitarian work. Even so, conflict zones are dangerous places. Even if people manage to keep safe, emotions will run high after witnessing human suffering. You can only imagine the thoughts and feelings they might experience if they saw innocent women and children getting killed.Extremist groups operating in Syria will be ready to exploit this vulnerability to get people to join as combatants. They may start out with innocent intentions to offer aid, but get caught up in the conflict once they are out there.

It’s important to note that young women can also be manipulated and recruited to these groups in supportive roles, such as transporting food, cooking, medical care of the wounded, fund raising and to pray for the fighters. Women may also be encouraged to marry fighters, glorifying the role of the wife. They may be told that it is honourable, and a privilege to be married to a man who will be a martyr.

Leaving these groups will not be easy because extremist organisations will make new recruits think they are in too deep to break away. Another commonly used tool to maintain loyalty involves getting members to take a pledge of obedience in the name of God. This tactic makes members believe that disobeying orders or leaving the group amounts to committing a grave sin.

So what can Muslim women say to loved ones?
A lot of families in communities are oblivious to this, or to their loved ones thinking about going overseas. But, mothers, sisters and girlfriends can often be the first to see behavioural changes among family members, including a preoccupation with the Syria crisis.

Women can warn their brothers, sons and husbands of the dangers of going to Syria, including the tactics used to recruit fighters and how even helping with humanitarian work can result in being drawn into activities that could be considered illegal under British law. Having these conversations early on can be essential in the prevention process.

The summer holidays are approaching and some students may be thinking of going to Syria to try and help out. Sadly, others may be going to seek adventure so that they can return to college or university to boast about their experiences. Whatever the reasons, they could end up getting killed or find themselves on the wrong side of the law when they return home. So now is the right time to start having these conversations. All young people may not listen, but it’s worth trying as it can result in a life-changing decision.

Women can also help manage young people’s emotions by directing them to channel their energies in supporting established and recognised charities with their work – rather than taking it upon themselves to fund-raise. Eighty per cent of the £25m raised so far for the Syrian conflict, through established charities, has reached people in Syria.

Many individuals are now fund raising for Syria. Although their efforts may be well intentioned, there is no way of really knowing where this money will end up. Only donating to internationally renowned charities already operating in Syria, such as Islamic Relief, should be encouraged. Humanitarian efforts should also be left to these charities, members of which are experts in operating in conflict regions.

Several reports in recent weeks have told of British Muslims who have either moved to Syria to join the anti-Assad rebels, have got killed in Syria, or have been arrested on their return to the UK. Let’s try to prevent young British Muslims getting caught up in the conflict in the first place.

Women, your country needs you.